For historians and modelers interested in detailed maps of the C&EI, visit our company store and check out the 1915 Valuation Maps. These maps were produced for the War Department during the great war. The maps show track arrangements, buildings, and right of way features.

FREIGHT TRAFFIC

Coal traffic
Bituminous coal represented the largest volume item for the C&EI, constituting about one-third of all C&EI traffic. Coal was the primary traffic in the Westville, Salem and Mt. Vernon areas of Illinois and the Clinton and Terre Haute areas of Indiana. A major portion of the coal generated by mines on the C&EI was destined for Chicago or the barge loading facility at Joppa, Illinois. So much coal was destined for the Chicago region steel mills that, for many years, the Elgin Joliet and Eastern (EJ&E) paid the C&EI for trackage rights to move their trains over the C&EI between its company-owned rails in the Chicago area and the coal mines located at Sidell and Westville on the C&EI.

Bridge traffic
Because C&EI rails connected with the rails of many other railroad companies, the C&EI moved a large volume of traffic that was neither generated on, nor destined for industries served by the C&EI. Rather, the C&EI acted as a bridge between these many connections with cars moving between railroads over the C&EI. Thus, for example, the C&EI might help move automobiles produced in Detroit to dealers located beyond Illinois, an series of interchanges that might involve several railroads.

This bridge traffic was a major source of revenue for the C&EI. More than half of all freight was for interchange, primarily the Louisville and Nashville in Evansville, the Missouri Pacific and western carriers in St. Louis, the Wabash in Danville and numerous carriers in the Chicago area through the Belt Yard and other connections. The IC, NYC, NKP, and PRR were major connections away from the larger cities.

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This 1872 map shows the route of the Chicago, Danville, & Vincennes, the predecessor company of the C&EI.

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A map from the 1900 C&EI Annual Report. This map emphasizes the C&EI's southwest connections. Notice on this map that the Woodlawn to Villa Grove extension has not be completed and the line from Findley, IL, to St. Louis has not been constructed. Also note that the Evansville & Terre Haute is not yet incorporated into the system. Also listed is the Evansville & Indianapolis and the Old Coal Road, which would become the Chicago, Attica, and Southern.

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This map from a 1905 C&EI Annual Report shows the completion of the Woodland Cutoff and the connection from Findely, IL, to St. Louis. Also note that the Evansville & Terre Haute and Evansville & Indianapolis are included in the system wide map.

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This 1908 map from an Evansville & Terre Haute Railroad Annual Report shows the Evansville & Indianapolis before it was sold to the New York Central. Also shown are the coal branches around Sullivan County, IN.

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This 1916 Annual Report map shows the planned construction of a branch from St. Elmo, IL, to Peoria. This branch, chartered as the Peoria & Eastern Illinois Railroad was graded in portions, but no rails were ever laid. Also note the Evansville & Indianapolis connection is not shown, that line having been sold to the New York Central Railroad.

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This 1925 C&EI Annual report map shows what will be the final C&EI system for the next fifty years.

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This map from a 1961 C&EI Annual Report lists the major interchange points for C&EI traffic.

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This 1975 Annual Report map shows the C&EI under MoPac ownership. Note the Woodlawn Juction to Evansville line has been sold the Louisville & Nashville Railroad in 1969.

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This map shows the general layout of the Chicago Heights Transfer Terminal. On the map, north is to the top.